A small group of Chinese Navy ships showed up near Alaska earlier this week during President Obama’s visit to the northern state, mostly as a “we’re here” message. But then, as the Chinese People’s Liberation Army marched in a Beijing parade, someone simultaneously put out this completely nuts video of a naval attack on an American fleet, and on an American base that looks suspiciously like the one on the Japanese island of Okinawa.

If that wasn’t stronger than a implicit “we’re here” message, I’m not sure what is. Couple that with news from earlier today showing that the Chinese Navy actually passed through American waters under the “Right of Innocent Passage” (something that the U.S. Navy is quite familiar with on its own), and you’ve got something quite explicit indeed.


First spotted by the Council on Foreign Relations, it’s not exactly subtle. It wasn’t the PLA Navy attacking a generic foreign navy, and a generic foreign base either. China’s enemy, in this example, very clearly resembled the United States, after a Chinese base suffered a first strike of its own.

UPDATE: The Council on Foreign Relations believes the video was created by the PLA, however, we can’t be sure of its provenance. It’s also possible it was created by Chinese tech company Tencent, which owns QQ/QZone, a social microblogging/gaming platform. This would make sense given that it feels like a video game and even starts like one, albeit with the usual roles (West good/Commies bad) reversed.


The video opens up with a Chinese soldier re-gaining consciousness after the surprise attack, a trope cribbed from the American video game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare:

It then moves to a fist in a war room slamming a table, while an overhead address system rattles off information. A garage opens, and out rolls mobile missile launchers of the PLA’s Second Artillery Corps, bearing what appear to be DF-15 and DF-21D (or possibly DF-26) anti-ship ballistic missiles.

The ballistic missile launches are accompanied by what looks to be Chinese H-6 bombers of the People’s Liberation Army Air Force, launching cruise missiles of their own.


Some of the ballistic missiles are showing bearing single conventional warheads, while others are shown bearing cluster munitions, destroying airbases and planes that look identical to the F-22 Raptor, a plane only flown by the American government:

Other warheads are then shown raining down on a foreign fleet, stocked completely with what looks identical to an American carrier group, all Arleigh Burke-class destroyers and a Nimitz-class aircraft carrier. The Arleigh Burkes fire off what look to be Phalanx Close-In Weapons Systems and anti-air Standard Missiles in defense:

But the Standard ballistic defense missiles fall completely short against the actively-maneuvering Chinese warheads. The Chinese missile-and-warhead combination most resemble the DF-21D, an anti-ship ballistic missile which has been called a “carrier-killer”:

The Chinese warheads all land, destroying the American-looking fleet. We see one submarine destroy another sub under the water, before surfacing and gazing up at what looks to be the PLA Navy’s Liaoning aircraft carrier (which it recently bought from Ukraine), launching J-15 fighter aircraft, Chinese-built navalized versions of Russia’s Su-33 Flanker-D:

The jet fighters soar over an amphibious force of Zubr-class hovercraft and landing ships, which place Type 96 tanks and other vehicles on a beachhead:

Once again, we cut to the skies, where we see Chengdu J-10B and next-generation J-20 fighter jets gracefully and easily evade air defenses, before dropping bombs and taking out what look to be identical to American F-35 fighters:

Surface-to-surface missiles and tanks literally fly through the air, as they remain unscathed from the enemy fire:

The foreign forces are vanquished, and the Chinese flag is raised over the remnants of the island base:

Trumpets blare, helicopters soar, and the combined forces of the People’s Liberation Army are victorious over the military force that looks damn near identical to an American one.



The Council on Foreign Relations noted a translation of the words that close it all out:

China is strong, victorious wars require deaths; for all to be strong and safe, [we] face the risks and dangers of war. We wholeheartedly love peace, but must be prepared for the likelihood of war. We respectfully and solemnly commemorate the 70th anniversary of the war against Japan.


(There is no mention of the inevitable nuclear holocaust that follows.)


Anyways, hope everyone has a happy Labor Day weekend! I bet someone’s got a good barbecue cookin’!

Contact the author at ballaban@jalopnik.com.
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